D5600 DSLR Camera Review

Summary

Despite only being a modest upgrade to the D5500, the D5600 remains a capable advanced entry-level DSLR, D5600 DSLR Camera Review explains all the features. This is a camera that is extremely much a sum of its parts instead of having one single standout feature. There’s a high-resolution 24.2MP sensor that produces very detailed images, an articulating touchscreen, a decent 39-point AF system, and polished handling are some of the highlights that make the D5600 one among the foremost well-rounded entry-level DSLRs available.

Pros
  • Excellent image quality
  • Comfy handgrip
  • Decent AF system
  • Touchscreen interface
Cons
  • N/A

D5600 DSLR Camera Review

Nikon’s entry-level DSLRs are often split into two groups: the D3xxx series, epitomized by the superb D3300, offering a really affordable way into DSLR photography; and therefore the D5xxx range of DSLRs designed for those trying to find a couple of more features and greater creative control.

As we saw with the recent D3400 upgrade to the D3300, instead of inaugurating a number of sweeping changes Nikon has opted for a smaller update, with the most notable new feature being the inclusion of Nikon’s SnapBridge technology, which facilitates easy and automatic transfer of images directly from the camera to smart device.

Features

  • Excellent APS-C CMOS sensor with a 24.2MP resolution
  • Nice and large 3.2-inch, vari-angle touchscreen
  • Only 1080p video capture

As far as features go, the specs for the D5600 are just about just like those of the D5500. The resolution remains equivalent at an honest 24.2MP, with the APS-C-sized CMOS sensor again shunning an optical low pass filter within the quest to tug out even more detail from the data recorded.

The D5600 also uses an equivalent EXPEED 4 image processor, with a native sensitivity range running from ISO100 to 25,600 meaning it should be quite comfortable shooting during a range of lighting conditions.

The optical viewfinder provides coverage of 95% of the frame (pretty standard on an entry-level DSLR), so for some key shots, you may want to double-check the composition on the rear display to make sure that nothing unwanted has crept into the acute edges of the frame.

Speaking of the display, there’s an equivalent 3.2-inch vari-angle touchscreen display with a 1,037,000-dot resolution, although its operation has been improved. It now offers the frame-advance bar we’ve seen on both the D5 and D500 to hurry up toggling through images, also as a crop function to be used during playback.

Another addition to the D5600 over the D5500 is Nikon’s timelapse movie function, as featured on models above the Nikon range. This allows for timelapse movies to be captured and put together entirely in-camera, with exposure smoothing function helping to even-out variations in lighting as your sequence is captured.

While other manufacturers are beginning to offer 4K video capture as standard, Nikon has, a touch bit disappointingly, decided to stay with 1080p capture here, with a choice of 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, and 24p frame rates. The D5600 features a small stereo microphone positioned just in front of the hot shoe; if you want to use a dedicated microphone, there’s a 2.5mm port on the side of the camera.

The D5600 are often purchased body-only, but will quite likely be bought with the bundled AF-P DX 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR lens (there’s a non-VR version also , but for a few dollars or pounds more it’s definitely worth the extra outlay for a lens with anti-shake technology).

The lens is nice and compact, as well as offering Nikon’s new silent AF and up to four stops of image stabilization. It’s more than up to the job of getting you started, and fine for general photography, although to make the most of the camera’s 24MP sensor, you’ll want to think about investing in extra lenses down the road .

Build and handling

  • Polycarbonate construction
  • Design virtually identical to D5500
  • Well-proportioned handgrip

This has enabled Nikon to reduce the number of parts used and keep the weight down – the D5600 tips the scales at 465g, body-only) the same as the D5500. And it’s not only the weight that’s the same, as the body appears to be pretty much identical to its predecessor – even the dimensions are the same, at 124 x 97 x 70mm.

Autofocus

  • 39-point AF, nine cross-type AF points
  • 39 or 11 AF points can be selected
  • Live View AF not as good as rivals

The D5600 sticks with Nikon’s proven 39-point Multi-CAM 4800DX AF system. It may be starting to show its age against mirrorless rivals offering ever-more AF points, but it’s still a very solid and accurate system when shooting with the viewfinder.

Performance

  • 5fps burst shooting not as fast as mirrorless rivals
  • 820-shot battery life is excellent
  • SnapBridge connectivity needs work

The D5600’s Matrix metering system copes well with a range of lighting situations, although you might need to dial in some negative exposure compensation in high-contrast scenes to retain highlight detail and recover shadow detail in post-processing if necessary.

Alternatively, the D5600’s Active D-Lighting system are often useful in such situations, retaining more detail in both the highlights and shadows when shooting JPEG files.

Image quality

  • ISO100-25,600
  • Creative Effect modes
  • No low-pass filter for even more detail

With the same sensor as the D5500 (and pretty much the same one as the D5300), the results from the 24.2MP chip didn’t throw up any nasty surprises.

As you’d expect, with all of these pixels packed onto the sensor, the resolution is extremely good, with the absence of a low-pass filter allowing intricate details to be recorded (for the simplest results, though, you’ll need something better than the 18-55mm kit lens), while there’s many scope for decent enlargements too.

Conclusion

As an upgrade to the D5500, the D5600 is a touch underwhelming – just like the D3400 update to the D3300, the changes are modest at best, while the SnapBridge technology featured still needs to be refined and become more stable. After reading this D5600 DSLR Camera Review, you can decide either the D5600 is a good choice or not. The product is available on Amazon with a high positive rating.

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